April 2016 Posts

Protected Areas Conservation Team (PA-CAT) celebrates Puerto Rico meeting its target to protect 16% of its lands


PRESS RELEASE

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Protected Areas Conservation Team (PA-CAT) celebrates Puerto Rico meeting its target to protect 16% of its lands

Haga clic aquí para descargar los nuevos datos de las áreas protegidas de Puerto Rico en el mapa interactivo del CLCC.

Click here to download new Protected Areas data of Puerto Rico in the Interactive Map of the CLCC.

Barranquitas-Comerío, Puerto Rico — The Protected Areas Conservation Action Team (PA-CAT), composed of the principal entities that manage Puerto Rico’s natural resources celebrated today the announcement that Puerto Rico achieved protection of 16% of its territory.

The 16 percent was achieved by adding existing Natural Protected Areas (NPAs) acquired by the state that were not previously counted, the acquisition of new lands for conservation by governmental and non-governmental organizations, and through a revision of the methodology traditionally used to count NPAs, which included the development of a new definition of NPAs that is in line with the parameters established in the United States and the International Union for Conservation of Nature at the global level.

This new definition by the PA-CAT establishes that “A Natural Protected Area is a Geographic area clearly define and limited through legal or other effective means for long term conservation of nature, biodiversity, ecological services and associated cultural values.”  

The methodology established by the PA-CAT Team assesses whether other areas with different protection mechanisms that are not the traditional mechanisms meet the requirements to be considered a Natural Protected Area under the new definition. One of these areas are the lands classified as Suelo Rústico Especialmente Protegido de la Zona Restricta del Área de Planificación Especial del Carso or Specially Protected Rustic Land of the Restricted Zone of the Special Planning Area of the Karst, as well as some parks, botanical gardens and landscapes or tracts of territory inhabited and managed by private owners where there are multiple uses compatible with conservation.

Leopoldo Miranda, Assistant Regional Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) mentioned: “The goal to protect the natural and cultural legacy of Puerto Rico is vital to ensure sustainable development now and for the future generations of the island. These lands are protected by thousands of private property owners, private organizations in conjunction with state and federal agencies and make sure that the island has a solid natural infrastructure able to support our healthy wildlife populations.”

Dr. Ariel Lugo, Director of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry (IITF) expressed “I support this initiative. The green areas and protected areas increase our quality of life in Puerto Rico. We need to protect the public interest and we know that citizens want to safeguard our species, recreate with friends and families in green areas, reduce flood risk and improve water quality. But protected areas are only one component of the broader panorama of conservation in Puerto Rico; through this team wee used a new approach of an integrated systems for the conservation of nature that includes various mechanisms for conservation of public and cultural values.”

Fernando Lloveras San Miguel, President of Para La Naturaleza, a unit of the Puerto Rico Conservation Trust, indicated: “Para la Naturaleza celebrates this development as a major step in our mission to achieve the protection of 33 percent of our territory for 2033. This significant conservation percentage increase is the result of collaboration of many sectors that are working together to effectively implement the conservation sciences and promote creative tools such as easements, land use plans and community initiatives. Our commitment is to keep moving us in this direction to protect the vital ecosystems that Puerto Rico needs to survive, while we strengthen our position as a destination for nature.”

Dr. William Gould, former Coordinator of the CLCC, stressed that: “the landscape of Puerto Rico is abundant in natural and cultural resources, el paisaje de Puerto Rico es abundante en recursos naturales y culturales, being very complex in terms of use, planning and management. The development and exchange of information is essential for public and private managers of natural resources so they can work efficiently taking into account the landscape as a whole. In this era of challenges and limited financial resources, it is even more important that state agencies and non-governmental organizations work together to synthesize information, coordinate scientific research, facilitate the exchange of knowledge and thus achieve effective management of ecosystems at the island level. It is for this important work the Caribbean Landscape Conservation Cooperative exists and this multi-organizational action team for the conservation of protected areas.”

Martin Smith, Manager and Director of the Bahía Beach Resort & Golf Club and Director of the Alma de Bahía Foundation, declared: “We are committed to the conservation of natural resources, ecosystems and wildlife in Puerto Rico, and honored to participate in this initiative that has allowed to join efforts with public and private organizations to support the consolidation of a System of Conservation that has at its core different categories of protected areas and promotes sustainability in the long term.”

Luis García Pelatti, President of the Puerto Rico Planning Board, pointed out: “Achieving the protection of 16 percent of Puerto Rico, with a level of conservation that can be measured by a group of knowledgeable entities in these matters, confirms the efforts of the Planning Board with the Land Use Plan to identify the 31 percent of Puerto Rico with ecological value.”

Related to the protection of a new protected area in Barranquitas-Comerío, Carlos Collazo Berríos, President of Comité Pro Reserva Natural Cañón Las Bocas, Inc., expressed: “15 years ago the Comité Pro Reserva Natural Cañón las Bocas described the magic of a unique ecological treasure between our mountains and was exploring the wonders of fauna, flora and the richness of its water resources. Their efforts placed Canyon Las Bocas on the map of the world and introduced the area to the scientific community the importance of its preservation. Consistency, commitment and educational work from the communities has been key so that today we celebrate a significant step to further promote the conservation of what will undoubtedly be the first nature reserve of Barranquitas and Comerio.”

The PA-CAT was created January 26, 2015 with the main objective to provide the information and advice needed to identify, recognize and manage the Protected Areas network on the Caribbean islands that are part of the United States. It also proposes the establishment of an Integrated System for the Conservation of Nature that other than Natural Protected Areas includes land use policies, special designations and other mechanisms that promote biodiversity conservation in public or private lands, through regulations or incentive programs. Using this system current initiatives are documented, a shared database is created, and strategic conservation is promoted using different tools.

The PA-CAT is composed by multiple entities, between federal agencies, state and non-governmental organizations, among others, including: the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DNER), the International Institute of Tropical Forestry (IITF) of the United States Forest Service (USFS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Puerto Rico Conservation Trust (Para La Naturaleza in Spanish), the Foundation Alma de Bahía, the Bahía Beach Resort, the Planning Board (JP, the acronym in Spanish), and the University of Puerto Rico. These agencies and organizations work together in an alliance called the Caribbean Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

The initiative signed a collaboration agreement between all entities comprising the PA-CAT in order to coordinate efforts to develop and manage information and provide mechanisms and protection strategies for protected natural areas and cultural resources of Puerto Rico in public areas and private.

Los directores de las organizaciones principales del Equipo PA-CAT firmaron un memorando de acuerdo para continuar trabajando a través de las agencias y organizaciones para el apoyo de la gestión de áreas protegidas. Primera fila (sentados, de izquierda a derecha): Leo Miranda, FWS, Carmen Guerrero, PR DRNA, William Gould, IITF. Segunda fila (de pie, de izquierda a derecha): Fernando Lloveras, Para la Naturaleza, Luis Pelatti, Junta de Planificación, Martin Smith, Bahía Beach Resort & Golf Club y director de la Fundación Alma de Bahía

The directors of the principal organizations of the Protected Areas Conservation Action Team signed a memorandum of agreement to continue working through the agencies and organizations that support the managment of protected areas. First row (seated, from left to right): Leo Miranda, FWS, Carmen Guerrero, PR DNER, William Gould, IITF. Second row (standing, from left to right):  Fernando Lloveras, Para la Naturaleza, Luis Pelatti, Junta de Planificación, Martin Smith, Bahía Beach Resort & Golf Club and director of the Fundación Alma de Bahía

###

Contacts:

DNER: Maricelis Rivera 787-615-2876 / Carmen M. Díaz 787-344-4701

CLCC / IITF / USFS: Kasey R Jacobs, kaseyrjacobs@caribbeanlcc.org, 787-764-7137

Para la Naturaleza: Yazmín Solla 787-942-1694 / yazmin.solla@gmail.com

Comité Pro Reserva Natural Cañón Las Bocas, Inc.: 939-256-9912 / canonlasbocas@gmail.com

Equipo de Acción para la Conservación de las Áreas Protegidas de Puerto Rico (PA-CAT) celebra protección del 16 por ciento


COMUNICADO DE PRENSA

Equipo de Acción para la Conservación de las Áreas Protegidas de Puerto Rico (PA-CAT) celebra protección del 16 por ciento

Haga clic aquí para descargar los nuevos datos de las áreas protegidas de Puerto Rico en el mapa interactivo del CLCC.

Haga clic aquí para descargar los nuevos datos de las áreas protegidas de Puerto Rico en el mapa interactivo del CLCC.

Martes, 19 de enero de 2016. Barranquitas-Comerío, Puerto Rico — El Equipo de Acción para la Conservación de las Áreas Protegidas de Puerto Rico (PA-CAT, por sus siglas en inglés), compuesto por las principales entidades que manejan los recursos naturales en Puerto Rico celebró hoy el anuncio de que Puerto Rico logró proteger el 16 por ciento del territorio.

El 16 por ciento se logró mediante la suma de Áreas Naturales Protegidas (ANP) existentes adquiridas por el estado que no estaban contabilizadas, la adquisición de nuevos terrenos para conservación por entidades gubernamentales y no gubernamentales, y mediante una revisión de la metodología que tradicionalmente se usaba para contabilizarlas, que incluyó el desarrollo de una nueva definición de ANP que es acorde con los parámetros establecidos en Estados Unidos y por la Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza a nivel mundial.

Esa nueva definición lograda por el Equipo PA-CAT establece que “un área natural protegida es un área geográfica, claramente definida y delimitada a través de medios legales u otros medios eficaces para la conservación a largo plazo de la naturaleza, biodiversidad, servicios ecosistémicos y valores culturales asociados”.

 

La metodología establecida por el Equipo PA-CAT permite evaluar si otras áreas con diferentes mecanismos de protección que no son los tradicionales, cumplen con los requisitos necesarios para ser consideradas como ANP bajo la nueva definición. Una de estas áreas son los terrenos calificados como Suelo Rústico Especialmente Protegido de la Zona Restricta del Área de Planificación Especial del Carso, así como algunos parques, jardines botánicos y paisajes o extensiones de territorio habitados y manejados por dueños privados donde existen múltiples usos compatibles con la conservación.

Leopoldo Miranda, director regional auxiliar del Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (USFWS) mencionó: “la meta de proteger el legado natural y cultural de Puerto Rico es vital para asegurar un desarrollo sostenible ahora y para la futura generación de la isla. Estos terrenos protegidos por miles de dueños de propiedades privadas, organizaciones privadas, en conjunto con agencias estatales y federales hacen que la isla tenga una infraestructura natural sólida, la cual es de gran apoyo para mantener saludable nuestra vida silvestre”.

El doctor Ariel Lugo, director del Instituto Internacional de Dasonomía Tropical (IITF) expresó “apoyo esta iniciativa. Las áreas verdes y áreas protegidas aumentan nuestra calidad de vida en Puerto Rico. Necesitamos proteger el interés público y sabemos que los ciudadanos queremos salvaguardar nuestras especies, disfrutar junto a nuestras amistades y familias en áreas verdes, disminuir el riesgo de inundaciones y mejorar la calidad del agua. Pero, las áreas protegidas son solo un componente del amplio panorama de la conservación en Puerto Rico; a través de este equipo usamos un nuevo enfoque de un sistema integrado para la conservación de la naturaleza que incluye distintos mecanismos para la conservación de los valores públicos y culturales”.

Fernando Lloveras San Miguel, presidente de Para La Naturaleza, indicó: “Para la Naturaleza celebra este avance como un gran paso  en nuestra misión de alcanzar la protección del 33 por ciento de nuestro territorio para el 2033. Este aumento significativo en la tasa de conservación es producto de la colaboración de muchos sectores que están trabajando juntos para aplicar efectivamente las ciencias a la conservación e impulsar herramientas creativas tales como las servidumbres, los planes de uso de terrenos y las iniciativas comunitarias.  Nuestro compromiso es seguir moviéndonos en esta dirección para salvaguardar los ecosistemas esenciales que necesita Puerto Rico para subsistir, a la vez que fortalecemos nuestra posición como destino de naturaleza”.

El doctor William Gould, anterior coordinador de la CLCC, resaltó que: “el paisaje de Puerto Rico es abundante en recursos naturales y culturales, siendo muy complejo en términos de usos, planificación y manejo. El desarrollo e intercambio de información es fundamental para que los administradores públicos y privados de los recursos naturales puedan trabajar eficientemente tomando en consideración el paisaje como un todo. En esta época de retos y escasos recursos económicos, es aún más importante que las agencias estatales y las organizaciones no gubernamentales trabajen en colaboración para sintetizar información, coordinar investigaciones científicas, facilitar el intercambio de conocimiento y lograr así un manejo eficaz de los ecosistemas a nivel isla.  Es por esta importante labor por la cual existe la Cooperativa para la Conservación del Paisaje del Caribe y el equipo multiorganizacional de acción para la conservación de áreas protegidas”.

Martin Smith, gerente y director del Bahía Beach Resort & Golf Club y director de la Fundación Alma de Bahía, delcaró:“estamos comprometidos con la conservación de recursos naturales, ecosistemas y vida silvestre en Puerto Rico, y nos honra participar de esta iniciativa que ha permitido unir esfuerzos con organizaciones publicas y privadas para apoyar la consolidación de un Sistema de Conservación que tenga como núcleo diferentes categorías de Áreas Protegidas y promueva la sostenibilidad en el largo plazo”.

Luis García Pelatti, presidente de la Junta de Planificación, señaló “Alcanzar la protección del 16 por ciento de Puerto Rico, con un nivel de conservación que puede ser medido por un grupo de entidades conocedoras de estos asuntos, confirma los esfuerzos de la Junta de Planificación con el Plan de Usos de Terrenos al señalar como de valor ecológico el 31 por ciento de Puerto Rico”.

A cerca de la protección de un área nueva natural en Barranquitas-Comerío, Carlos Collazo Berríos, presidente del Comité Pro Reserva Natural Cañón Las Bocas, Inc., expresó: “hace 15 años el Comité Pro Reserva Natural Cañón las Bocas describió con la magia de un tesoro ecológico único entre nuestras montañas y fue explorando las maravillas de su fauna, flora y la riqueza de su recurso agua. Sus esfuerzos colocaron al Cañón Las Bocas en el mapa del mundo y le dio a conocer a la comunidad científica la importancia de su preservación. La consistencia, compromiso y trabajo educativo desde las comunidades ha sido clave para que hoy celebremos un paso trascendental para continuar promoviendo la conservación de lo que será sin duda la primera reserva natural de Barranquitas y Comerío”.

El PA-CAT se creó el 26 de enero de 2015 con el objetivo principal de proveer información y brindar asesoramiento necesario para identificar, reconocer y gestionar la red de áreas naturales protegidas en las islas del Caribe que son parte de Estados Unidos.  Además, propone el establecimiento del Sistema Integrado para la Conservación de la Naturaleza que además de las ANP,  incluye políticas de usos de suelo, designaciones especiales (eg., hábitat críticos) y otros mecanismos que promueven la conservación de la biodiversidad en tierras publicas o privadas, ya sea a través de leyes o programas de incentivos. Mediante ese sistema, se documentan todas las iniciativas actuales, se crea una base de datos compartida, y se promueve la conservación estratégica por medio de diversas herramientas.

El PA-CAT está compuesto por múltiples entidades, entre ellas agencias federales, estatales, organizaciones no gubernamentales, entre otros: el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales (DRNA), el Instituto Internacional de Dasonomía Tropical (IITF) del Servicio Forestal federal (USFS), el Servicio federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (USFWS), la entidad Para la Naturaleza, la Fundación Alma de Bahía, el Bahía Beach Resort, la Junta de Planificación (JP), la Universidad de Puerto Rico y el Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña (ICP). Estas agencias y organizaciones trabajan juntos a través de una alianza llamada la Cooperativa para la Conservación del Paisaje en el Caribe (CLCC, por sus siglas en inglés).

La iniciativa fue suscrita en acuerdo de colaboración entre todas las entidades que integran el PA-CAT a fin de coordinar esfuerzos para desarrollar y manejar información y proveer mecanismos y estrategias de protección para las áreas naturales protegidas y los recursos culturales de Puerto Rico en áreas públicas y privadas.

Los directores de las organizaciones principales del Equipo PA-CAT firmaron un memorando de acuerdo para continuar trabajando a través de las agencias y organizaciones para el apoyo de la gestión de áreas protegidas. Primera fila (sentados, de izquierda a derecha): Leo Miranda, FWS, Carmen Guerrero, PR DRNA, William Gould, IITF. Segunda fila (de pie, de izquierda a derecha): Fernando Lloveras, Para la Naturaleza, Luis Pelatti, Junta de Planificación, Martin Smith, Bahía Beach Resort & Golf Club y director de la Fundación Alma de Bahía

Los directores de las organizaciones principales del Equipo PA-CAT firmaron un memorando de acuerdo para continuar trabajando a través de las agencias y organizaciones para el apoyo de la gestión de áreas protegidas. Primera fila (sentados, de izquierda a derecha): Leo Miranda, FWS, Carmen Guerrero, PR DRNA, William Gould, IITF. Segunda fila (de pie, de izquierda a derecha): Fernando Lloveras, Para la Naturaleza, Luis Pelatti, Junta de Planificación, Martin Smith, Bahía Beach Resort & Golf Club y director de la Fundación Alma de Bahía

###

Contactos:

DRNA: Maricelis Rivera 787-615-2876 / Carmen M. Díaz 787-344-4701

CLCC / IITF / USFS: Kasey R Jacobs, kaseyrjacobs@caribbeanlcc.org, 787-764-7137

Para la Naturaleza: Yazmín Solla 787-942-1694 / yazmin.solla@gmail.com

Comité Pro Reserva Natural Cañón Las Bocas, Inc.: 939-256-9912 / canonlasbocas@gmail.com

New Study Explores Consequences of Projected Climate Changes in Temperature and Rainfall for Puerto Rico


 

New Study Explores Consequences of Projected Climate Changes in Temperature and Rainfall for Puerto Rico

Consequences could include increasing energy demands for cooling, increasing likelihood of drought and shifts in ecological life zones

Photo Credits: (Top) Cerrillos Dam, Cordillera Central mountain range (USACE, 2013) and (Bottom) NOAA National Weather Service, EFE/Archive, Carraizo Reservoir

Photo Credits: (Top) Cerrillos Dam, Cordillera Central mountain range (USACE, 2013) and
(Bottom) NOAA National Weather Service, EFE/Archive, Carraizo Reservoir

SAN JUAN, PR — A new study published in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology explores the implications of various climate change projections for Puerto Rico and presents maps of potential future temperature and rainfall scenarios that indicate substantial changes in temperature and rainfall island-wide to differing degrees depending on decade and location. The results show temperatures increasing from 4.6 °C to 9 °C (8 °F to 16 °F), and rainfall decreasing  up to 50% by the end of the century. The study details how these changes interact with the topography of the island and shows trends of increasing cooling degree days, increasing annual number of days without rain, and shifting ecological life zones as temperature and rainfall patterns change over the next century. The implications vary depending on which climate models and greenhouse gas emission scenarios are used, but all show significant increases in temperatures and decreasing rainfall by the end of the century.

Researchers from the International Institute of Tropical Forestry (IITF), U.S. Geological Survey, North Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (NCCFWRU) and the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) began work in 2012 with support from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Forest Service. Efforts in Puerto Rico to prepare infrastructure and natural resource managers for climate change had been hindered for years by the lack of available future climate information specific to the island. Results from this study begin to fill an information gap that had been recognized by local researchers since at least 2002, in UPR round table discussions, at Puerto Rico Climate Change Council meetings and in their preeminent report “Puerto Rico’s State of the Climate 2010-2013” and conferences like Climate Change in the Caribbean at Inter American University Law School in 2011 and 2015.

“Through this work we are beginning to develop a better understanding of where in Puerto Rico changes in temperatures and rainfall will occur,” stated lead scientist Dr. Azad Henareh, now with Colorado State University, “This research helps us understand that these changes could be substantial.  More needs to be done to shed light on the particular characteristics of these expected changes across the complex topography of the island.”

Dr. Henareh and the team were able to model and map future climate changes for the first time specific to Puerto Rico’s unique topography and ecosystems. This study is the third of a suite of linked research projects by NCCFWRU and IITF with support from the Caribbean Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CLCC) and builds on the studies previously done. The first study completed for the Department of the Interior’s Southeast Climate Science Center and the CLCC was conducted by Dr. Katharine Hayhoe of Texas Tech University. She produced Puerto Rico-specific climate projections from twelve statistically downscaled Global Climate Models (GCMs). These data were used by a team led by Dr. Ashley E. Van Beusekom of IITF to model the effects of changing land cover on streamflow in Puerto Rico, including Vieques and Culebra. This third study, Henareh et al. 2016, provides results for future changes in temperature, rainfall, evapotranspiration, annual cooling degree-days and ecological life zones.

Projected life zones from the average of all models under the three emission scenarios (the emission scenarios do not apply to the first time interval)

Projected life zones from the average of all models under the three emission scenarios (the emission scenarios do not apply to the first time interval).

The study suggests we will see shifts in ecological life zones from wetter to drier environments with the possibility of losing most, if not all, of the wettest life zones at upper elevations. Future climatic conditions may also result in new, drier ecosystems in southwestern Puerto Rico. Consequences of projected changes in temperature and rainfall are not just limited to plants and animals but to Puerto Rico’s infrastructure and economics as well. The team modeled annual cooling degree-days as a proxy index for air-conditioning energy demand and found significant increases in the number of days annually at which one might need to use energy for cooling buildings.  Another consequence of the potential changes the island could face is more extreme water deficits, as Dr. Van Beusekom’s work shows, a daunting possibility as Puerto Rico had one of the worst droughts in its history in 2015 with 5-day water rationing in many metropolitan communities.

“By making explicit the range of potential climate outcomes faced by the island, this study will help focus a number of important conversations on drought, water supply, and energy.” Gerard McMahon, Director of the U.S. Geological Survey Southeast Climate Science Center, added that “continuing work funded by the DOI SE Climate Science Center should provide additional detail about expected climate conditions and support decisions under consideration by the public, the government, and the private sector.”

Dr. William Gould, Research Ecologist for the International Institute of Tropical Forestry and one of the study authors, stated that “The Caribbean Landscape Conservation Cooperative has a strong interest in science delivery to address climate change issues. Now that this study has been completed, the Cooperative will be working to make sure the information is widely available and useful to managers and researchers.” Dr. Gould presented findings of the study at today’s VII Puerto Rico Climate Change Council Summit at the Condado Plaza Hotel.

###

 

Available for Use by Media Professionals:

The full published scientific article.

High-resolution graphics in English and Spanish for temperature and rainfall by scenario (dropbox folder 1)

Animation (.mp4 files/dropbox folder 2; YouTube)

Descargar las proyecciones de la temperatura, la precipitación, la evapotranspiración y las zonas de vidas ecológicas en el mapa interactivo del CLCC.

Link to visualize and download the climate data on the Interactive Map of the CLCC Data Center (click on “Future Scenarios” and then click on the search bar to browse all the available data layers. Select the layers you would like to view and then close the search box to view the data on the map).

 

 

 

 

Note: The results represent three scenarios: best, medium and worst case outcomes for Puerto Rico at three timer periods. These scenarios provide a boundary for what we might expect to occur and serve as storylines describing future characteristics for demographic changes, economic growth, and technological change (labeled B1, A1B and A2). What Puerto Rico experiences in 2030, 2060, or 2090 will depend on these characteristics and the level of carbon pollution emitted by the world-wide community in the coming decades. They are standard climate scenarios frequently used by researchers with the Nobel peace prize winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Colloquially you can say that the B1 scenario is the “best case scenario”, A2 is the “worst case scenario”, and A1B is “middle of the road”.

Nuevo Estudio Explora Consecuencias De Cambios Climáticos Proyectados En Temperatura y Precipitación Para Puerto Rico


Nuevo Estudio Explora Consecuencias De Cambios Climáticos Proyectados En Temperatura y Precipitación Para Puerto Rico

Consecuencias incluyen aumento de la demanda de energía para la refrigeración, aumentos en la probabilidad de sequía y cambios en las zonas de vida ecológicas

 

Photo Credits: (Top) Cerrillos Dam, Cordillera Central mountain range (USACE, 2013) and (Bottom) NOAA National Weather Service, EFE/Archive, Carraizo Reservoir

Créditos: (Arriba) Cerrillos Dam, Cordillera Central mountain range (USACE, 2013) y
(Abajo) NOAA National Weather Service, EFE/Archive, Carraizo Reservoir

Jueves, 7 de abril de 2016. San Juan, Puerto Rico Un nuevo estudio publicado en la revista científica Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology explora las implicaciones de las proyecciones de cambio climático para Puerto Rico y presenta mapas de los posibles escenarios futuros. Las proyecciones indican cambios sustanciales en los promedios de temperatura y precipitación en toda la isla, así como variaciones según la década analizada y el área geográfica. Los resultados muestran un aumento de la temperatura de 4.6°C a 9°C (8°F a 16°F), y una disminución de la precipitación de hasta un 50% para finales de siglo. El estudio detalla cómo estos cambios están relacionados con la topografía de la isla y advierte una tendencia hacia el aumento de los días de calor al año y en la demanda de refrigeración, así como un aumento en el número de días sin lluvia al año y el desplazamiento de las zonas ecológicas de vida, al cambiar los patrones de temperatura y precipitación a lo largo del próximo siglo. Las consecuencias varían en función de los modelos climáticos utilizados y en los distintos escenarios, según las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero; pero todos muestran incrementos significativos en la temperatura y la disminución de la precipitación para finales de siglo.

Investigadores del Instituto Internacional de Dasonomía Tropical (IITF), del Servicio Geológico de los Estados Unidos (USGS), de la Unidad de Investigación del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de Carolina del Norte (NCCFWRU), y de la Universidad de Puerto Rico (UPR) comenzaron a trabajar en 2012 con el apoyo del USGS, del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre Federal (USFWS por sus siglas en inglés), y del Servicio Forestal de Estados Unidos. Por años, los esfuerzos en Puerto Rico para capacitar a los manejadores de recursos naturales y de infraestructura sobre el cambio climático se han visto obstaculizados por la falta de información sobre el futuro estado del clima para la isla. Los resultados de este estudio comienzan a llenar un vacío de información que ha sido reconocido por los investigadores locales desde 2002, particularmente en varios encuentros en la Universidad de Puerto Rico, en las reuniones del Consejo de Cambios Climáticos de Puerto Rico detalladas en su informe sobre el “Estado del Clima en Puerto Rico 2010-2013”, y en conferencias como el “Cambio Climático en el Caribe” llevadas a cabo en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad Interamericana en 2011 y 2015.

“A través de este trabajo estamos empezando a entender mejor cuándo y dónde se producirán cambios en temperatura y lluvias en Puerto Rico”, declaró el científico principal del estudio, el Dr. Azad Henareh, ahora con la Universidad de Colorado. “Esta investigación nos ayuda a comprender que éstos cambios pueden ser sustanciales. Aún queda mucho por hacer para arrojar luz sobre las características particulares de estos cambios proyectados a través de la compleja topografía de la isla”.

El Dr. Henareh y el grupo de trabajo fueron capaces de modelar y realizar un mapa de los futuros cambios climáticos, que por primera vez, que fueran específicos para la topografía y los ecosistemas únicos en Puerto Rico. Este estudio es el tercero de una seria de estudios relacionados hechos por Unidad de Investigación del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de Carolina del Norte y el Instituto Internacional de Dasonomía Tropical, con apoyo de la Cooperativa para la Conservación del Paisaje en el Caribe (CLCC). El mismo complementa estudios hechos previamente. El primer estudio completado por el Centro Climático de Ciencia del Sureste del Departamento del Interior y la CLCC, conducidos por la Dra. Katharine Hayhoe de la Universidad Texas Tech. Ella completó una serie de proyecciones climáticas específicas para el clima de Puerto Rico basadas en doce Modelos Globales Climáticos (GCMs en inglés) de datos estadísticos a escala reducida. Estos datos fueron utilizados por el grupo liderado por la Dra. Ashley E. Van Beusekom del Instituto Internacional de Dasonomía Tropical, para modelar los efectos del flujo hidrológico de la cambiante cobertura del terreno en Puerto Rico; incluyendo a las islas de Vieques y Culebra. En este tercer estudio, Henareh et al. 2016, provee resultados para futuros cambios en temperaturas, precipitación, evapotranspiración, días anuales de enfriamiento y zonas de vida ecológicas.

Projected life zones from the average of all models under the three emission scenarios (the emission scenarios do not apply to the first time interval)

Las zonas de vida ecológicas proyectadas del promedio de todos los modelajes y tres escenarios (No aplican los escenarios a los años 1960-1990).

 

El estudio sugiere que veremos cambios en las zonas de vida ecológicas, de zonas mas húmedas hacia ambientes mas secos; con la posibilidad de la pérdida de la mayoría, sino de todas, las zonas de vida húmedas encontradas en elevaciones altas. Las condiciones climáticas futuras pueden resultar en ecosistemas nuevos y secos en el suroeste de Puerto Rico. Las consecuencias de los cambios proyectados en temperatura y precipitación no están solamente limitados a las plantas  y los animales, pero también a la infraestructura de Puerto Rico y su economía. El equipo modeló los días anuales de enfriamiento como un índice para la demanda de energía para refrigeración y encontraron aumentos significantes en el número de días en que anualmente se necesite usar energía para enfriar los edificios. Otra consecuencia de los potenciales cambios que la isla pudiese afrontar es escasez de agua mas severa; mostrado en el trabajo de la Dra. Van Beusekom, una posibilidad no tan lejana a la realidad de la sequía del 2015, con 5 días de racionamiento de agua en muchas comunidades del área metropolitana.

“Haciendo explícito el rango de posibilidades climáticas potenciales que la isla pudiese enfrentar, el estudio ayudará a enfocar importantes conversaciones alrededor del tema de la sequía, el abastecimiento de agua, y la energía” Gerard McMahon, Director del Centro Climático de Ciencia del Sureste del Servicio Geológico de EU, añadió que “un estudio continuo con fondos del Servicio Geológico de EU/ Depto. del Interior/ Centro Climático de Ciencias del Sureste deberían proveer detalles adicionales sobre las condiciones climáticas esperadas y apoyar en la toma de decisiones bajo la consideración del público, el gobierno y el sector privado”.

El Dr. William Gould, Ecólogo Investigador para el Instituto Internacional de Dasonomía Tropical y uno de los autores del estudio, mencionó que “La Cooperativa para la Conservación del Paisaje en el Caribe ha tenido un gran interés en la difusión de la ciencia para enfocar los asuntos de cambio climático. Ahora que este estudio ha sido completado, la Cooperativa trabajará para asegurarse de que la información sea accesible y útil para los manejadores y los investigadores.” El Dr. Gould presentó los resultados esta mañana en el 7mo Congreso del Consejo de Cambios Climáticos de Puerto Rico en el Hotel Condado Plaza.

###

 

Contacto:

Kasey R. Jacobs Curran

516-376-8791

kaseyrjacobs@caribbeanlcc.org

 

Disponible para uso de los profesionales de las redes:

Para el artículo científico completo (pdf).

Gráficas de alta resolución en inglés y en español para temperatura y precipitación por escenario (dropbox folder 1)

Animación (.mp4 files; dropbox folder 2)

Descargar las proyecciones de la temperatura, la precipitación, la evapotranspiración y las zonas de vidas ecológicas en el mapa interactivo del CLCC.

Enlace para visualizar y bajar los datos climáticos en el Mapa Interactivo del Centro de Datos de la CLCC (presione en “Future Scenarios” y luego presione en la barra de búsqueda para visualizar todas las capas de data disponibles. Seleccione las capas que desee ver y entonces cierre la caja de búsqueda para visualizar la data en el mapa.

 

 

 

 

 

Nota: Los resultados representados para los tres escenarios: mejor, mediano y peor resultado para Puerto Rico en tres periodos de tiempo. Los escenarios proveen una idea de lo que podemos esperar que ocurra y sirven como formas de describir características futuras para los cambios demográficos, crecimiento económico y cambios en la tecnología  (identificados como B1, A1B y A2). Lo que PR experimente en el 2030, 2060 y 2090, dependerá de estas características y del nivel de las emisiones de Carbono emitidas a nivel global en las próximas décadas. Los escenarios climáticos estándar son usados frecuentemente por los investigadores con el premio de Nobel de la paz ganando el Panel Intergubernamental de Cambio Climático. Coloquialmente se puede decir que el escenario B1 es el “ mejor escenario , el A2 es el “peor escenario” y el A1B es” la mitad del camino”.